Politics

Clinton’s Streak As Most Admired Woman Ends After 16 Years

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Mike Brest Reporter

For the first time in 17 years, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was not voted as the woman Americans most admire, according to a Gallup poll released Thursday.

Former first lady Michelle Obama was named the woman Americans admire most in the world with 15 percent of those surveyed choosing her. Oprah Winfrey came in second place, amassing only 5 percent of the vote, with Clinton coming in tied at third with Melania Trump at 4 percent.

First lady Michelle Obama speaks to a crowd of supporters as she campaigns for the Democratic Party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at the Convention Center, in Phoenix, Arizona on October 20, 2016. (Photo credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

First lady Michelle Obama speaks to a crowd of supporters as she campaigns for the Democratic Party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at the Convention Center, in Phoenix, Arizona on October 20, 2016. (Photo credit: MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)

When looking at the breakdown for Democrats who were surveyed, Clinton finished tied with Winfrey and behind Obama. Conversely, the former presidential candidate received less than 0.5 percent of the vote from Republicans.

Former President Barack Obama won the award as the man most admired by Americans for the eleventh consecutive year. President Donald Trump came in second place this year, finishing with 13 percent compared to 19 percent for his predecessor. (RELATED: Michelle Obama Describes Feelings About Trump Inauguration: ‘Bye Felicia’)

The last time Hillary Clinton was not voted “most admired” was in 2001, when then-first lady Laura Bush won the honor. However, Clinton also won four consecutive years prior to Bush’s victory. So Clinton has won the award for 20 of the last 21 years.

Gallup conducted 1,025 phone interviews with people 18 years or older from Dec. 3-12. There’s a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

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